We’re number 101: US women in politics. What would get us closer to Rwanda, China, Iraq, or Afghanistan in gender equity in our national legislature?

A Gender Studies professor shared a piece from Politico exploring what might change our current gender inequalities in public office. What would it take for women to win?

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Dr. Sue Wortmann, professor of Women and Crime and winner of the 2017 Lincoln Mayor’s Women’s Commission Alice Paul Award, with State Senator and champion of equal rights, Patty Pansing Brooks

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Comey’s Story Sounds Like (Sexual) Harassment — poptraction

President Trump’s strategy to wine and dine James Comey, corner him alone in a room, and bother him with pointlessly flattering phone calls sounds an awful lot like sexual harassment to women who have experienced it. I am not suggesting that Trump’s goal was sexual dominance, but it was certainly dominance of a gendered sort. […]

via Comey’s Story Sounds Like (Sexual) Harassment — poptraction

Changes, Scholarship, Awards, Leadership, Inclusion – NWU Gender Studies rules!

IMG_6678.JPGAs lilacs begin blooming on campus, the semester winds down, and another chapter in the Gender Studies program concludes, we remember our former students and note faculty achievements. Read on for news about your former professors.

We are a program that embraces change. We are delighted that Dr. Abigail Mitchell, professor of Psychology of Gender, will direct the Gender Studies program, especially given her publication record on perceptions of gender and leadership as well as research on romantic relationships. This year Dr. Mitchell designed and taught a much-needed new course, Transgender Identities, and she works with NWU’s Action Council on Diversity and Inclusion to keep NWU up to date on lgbtq+ issues. Dr. Brad Tice, also a key member of the Action Council, is currently enjoying sabbatical while preparing a new course, Writing the Body.

We are a program at the cutting edge of innovative scholarship. Five Gender Studies professors, Lisa Borchardt, Gerise Herndon, Lisa Wilkinson, Sandra Mathews, and Rachel Pokora are poised to begin their sabbatical research. Lisa Borchardt will teach Family Violence this summer before delving deeper into research on loss and grief, focusing on issues that affect student athletes. Professor Borchardt was nominated for the prestigious Margaret J. Prouty teaching award this spring. Gerise Herndon, professor of Women Writing Across Cultures and Gender and the Art of Film, will take students to Haiti prior to her presentation in France on Haitian-American literature; her next project entails research in India on hijra/transgender identities in literature and film. Lisa Wilkinson, who teaches Feminist Theories and Philosophies of Race and Gender in addition to having inaugurated our junior seminar, Perspectives in Gender, will combine knowledge gleaned from the “Genocide Studies in Rwanda” program with her ongoing research into “strangers” in ancient and classical Greece.

We are an award-winning program. In the past three years, both Dr. Wilkinson and Sandra Mathews have won the NWU Faculty Scholar award for their impressive publication records. Dr. Mathews, professor of Women of the U.S. West, has also been honored with the Faculty Advisor award. During sabbatical, she continues her scholarship on American Indian sovereignty. Rachel Pokora, also a prolific author and nominee for the scholar award, taught her popular Communication and Gender course this spring before launching into research on dialogue, power, and organized religion. John Spilker, professor of Music History: Gender and Sexuality as well as Sex and the Arts, received the Prouty teaching award after having been nominated four years in a row after only six years of teaching at NWU.  Rita Lester and Gerise Herndon also number among previous Prouty awardees. Sue Wortmann was selected for the Alice Paul Award by the Lincoln Mayor’s Women’s Commission for lifelong dedication to women’s rights (Herndon was a recipient way back in 2003). Additionally, Dr. Wortmann was honored with NWU’s Exemplary Teacher award in 2015 for her innovative Women and Crime class, her service as Deputy Title IX Coordinator, and exceptional grant-writing that earned NWU a major Department of Justice grant to help prevent sexual assault. Dr. Spilker and Dr. Wortmann will teach a new Gender Studies course in Cuba in May. Other Exemplary Teacher awardees include Spilker, Meghan Winchell, Rachel Pokora, and Sandy McBride. This year John was also honored by Action Council with the Diversity Award. Previous honorees include Abby Mitchell, Brad Tice, Lisa Wilkinson, and Gerise Herndon.

We are also a program that leads: the current and past three faculty presidents are Gender Studies faculty. Meghan Winchell, currently serving as faculty president, designed an innovative service learning project in U.S. History of Women. Students created curriculum for GirlPowR, a nonprofit offering girls after-school education in empowerment, using lesson plans on topics like “Discovering My True Self,” “Body Image and Media,” and “Women Leaders.” Larry McClain, who served as president prior to Dr. Winchell, redesigned Topics in World Literature: Sexualities, and co-taught Perspectives in Gender with Lisa Wilkinson. Rita Lester, faculty president before Dr. McClain, always has a waiting list for Women in Religion. Jay Chipman, president before Dr. Lester, created the Drama: Gender and Sexuality course and directed a stunning production of Rocky Horror Picture Show this fall.

Some of you have worked or volunteered at the Women’s Resource Center. In NWU’s quest to be more inclusive, we’ve moved the former WRC to a more visible location and renamed it the Gender Advocacy Place, or GAP. Thanks to Joan Gilbreth for the new name! Thirteen GAP volunteers attended the Women’s March on Washington in January and created a powerful video about this significant experience.

Enough about us – what about you? What has changed for you? Check out our blog at nwugenderstudies.wordpress.com, join our Nebraska Wesleyan University Gender Studies facebook group, like our page, or drop us a line the old-fashioned way and let us know what you’re up to these days.

Best wishes for a wonderful summer

Gerise Herndon,
On behalf of the Gender Studies Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 May 2017

 

Dear alumni,

 

As lilacs begin blooming on campus, the semester winds down, and another chapter in the Gender Studies program concludes, we remember our former students and note faculty achievements. Read on for news about your former professors.

 

We are a program that embraces change. We are delighted that Dr. Abigail Mitchell, professor of Psychology of Gender, will direct the Gender Studies program, especially given her publication record on perceptions of gender and leadership as well as research on romantic relationships. This year Dr. Mitchell designed and taught a much-needed new course, Transgender Identities, and she works with NWU’s Action Council on Diversity and Inclusion to keep NWU up to date on lgbtq+ issues. Dr. Brad Tice, also a key member of the Action Council, is currently enjoying sabbatical while preparing a new course, Writing the Body.

 

We are a program at the cutting edge of innovative scholarship. Five Gender Studies professors, Lisa Borchardt, Gerise Herndon, Lisa Wilkinson, Sandra Mathews, and Rachel Pokora are poised to begin their sabbatical research. Lisa Borchardt will teach Family Violence this summer before delving deeper into research on loss and grief, focusing on issues that affect student athletes. Professor Borchardt was nominated for the prestigious Margaret J. Prouty teaching award this spring. Gerise Herndon, professor of Women Writing Across Cultures and Gender and the Art of Film, will take students to Haiti prior to her presentation in France on Haitian-American literature; her next project entails research in India on hijra/transgender identities in literature and film. Lisa Wilkinson, who teaches Feminist Theories and Philosophies of Race and Gender in addition to having inaugurated our junior seminar, Perspectives in Gender, will combine knowledge gleaned from the “Genocide Studies in Rwanda” program with her ongoing research into “strangers” in ancient and classical Greece.

 

We are an award-winning program. In the past three years, both Dr. Wilkinson and Sandra Mathews have won the NWU Faculty Scholar award for their impressive publication records. Dr. Mathews, professor of Women of the U.S. West, has also been honored with the Faculty Advisor award. During sabbatical, she continues her scholarship on American Indian sovereignty. Rachel Pokora, also a prolific author and nominee for the scholar award, taught her popular Communication and Gender course this spring before launching into research on dialogue, power, and organized religion. John Spilker, professor of Music History: Gender and Sexuality as well as Sex and the Arts, received the Prouty teaching award after having been nominated four years in a row after only six years of teaching at NWU.  Rita Lester and Gerise Herndon also number among previous Prouty awardees. Sue Wortmann was selected for the Alice Paul Award by the Lincoln Mayor’s Women’s Commission for lifelong dedication to women’s rights (Herndon was a recipient way back in 2003). Additionally, Dr. Wortmann was honored with NWU’s Exemplary Teacher award in 2015 for her innovative Women and Crime class, her service as Deputy Title IX Coordinator, and exceptional grant-writing that earned NWU a major Department of Justice grant to help prevent sexual assault. Dr. Spilker and Dr. Wortmann will teach a new Gender Studies course in Cuba in May. Other Exemplary Teacher awardees include Spilker, Meghan Winchell, Rachel Pokora, and Sandy McBride. This year John was also honored by Action Council with the Diversity Award. Previous honorees include Abby Mitchell, Brad Tice, Lisa Wilkinson, and Gerise Herndon.

 

We are also a program that leads: the current and past three faculty presidents are Gender Studies faculty. Meghan Winchell, currently serving as faculty president, designed an innovative service learning project in U.S. History of Women. Students created curriculum for GirlPowR, a nonprofit offering girls after-school education in empowerment, using lesson plans on topics like “Discovering My True Self,” “Body Image and Media,” and “Women Leaders.” Larry McClain, who served as president prior to Dr. Winchell, redesigned Topics in World Literature: Sexualities, and co-taught Perspectives in Gender with Lisa Wilkinson. Rita Lester, faculty president before Dr. McClain, always has a waiting list for Women in Religion. Jay Chipman, president before Dr. Lester, created the Drama: Gender and Sexuality course and directed a stunning production of Rocky Horror Picture Show this fall.

 

Some of you have worked or volunteered at the Women’s Resource Center. In NWU’s quest to be more inclusive, we’ve moved the former WRC to a more visible location and renamed it the Gender Advocacy Place, or GAP. Thanks to Joan Gilbreth for the new name! Thirteen GAP volunteers attended the Women’s March on Washington in January and created a powerful video about this significant experience.

 

Enough about us – what about you? What has changed for you? Check out our blog at nwugenderstudies.wordpress.com, join our Nebraska Wesleyan University Gender Studies facebook group, like our page, or drop us a line the old-fashioned way and let us know what you’re up to these days.
Best wishes for a wonderful summer.

 
Gerise Herndon

On behalf of the Gender Studies Program

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#WhyIMarch #NWU Gender Studies presentations Wed a.m. SC 242

Check out the Perspectives in Gender presentations tomorrow morning 9-10:30 am, Smith-Curtis 242.

 

NWU marches on DC

Why Preferred Pronouns?

MBLGTAC Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally Conference

Recovering Identity – addiction and sexuality

#WhyWeMarched

Gender Studies presentations

https://nebraskawesleyanresearchsym2017.sched.com/overview/type/Gender+Studies

NWSA Statement on Combatting Fear, Division, Xenophobia following election

The National Women’s Studies Association Statement on Combatting the Climate of Fear, Division and Xenophobia in the Wake of the U.S. Presidential Election

The National Women’s Studies Association met in Montréal, Canada in the immediate wake of the November 8, 2016 U.S. presidential election, and many of us were shaken by the results. As transnational, indigenous, intersectional and anti-racist feminist scholars, and practitioners, and scholars of conscience, we feel compelled to speak out about the implications of this political moment for the work we do and the communities of which we are a part. Throughout this election season, and in the weeks since November 8th, women and girls, LGBTQIA people, poor and working people, Muslims and Arab-Americans, Jews, Black people, indigenous people, Mexicans, Latinx, immigrant communities, and people with disabilities have been threatened and maligned. Racist, xenophobic, Islamophobic, anti-Semitic, homophobic, ablest, transphobic and misogynist views have been rampant in the public sphere, sparking instances of harassment, intimidation, and assault. Women have been insulted and mocked, sexual assault has been trivialized, and Black communities have been disparaged and maligned. Millions of undocumented residents fear unjust deportations. And climate change denial places the future of the entire planet at risk.

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We recognize that none of us are entirely safe. Intellectuals and teachers have been, and continue to be, the victims of authoritarian regimes around the world and over time. Although critical thinking and transgressive pedagogy are often perceived as dangerous to certain political agendas, NWSA embraces these features of our work and calls on members to use our collective energies to push back against the climate of fear, xenophobia and anti-intellectualism that have become so prevalent. We must do what we do best which is to provide alternative ways of thinking, expose myths and lies through our research and writing, engage a broader public, and insist upon critical and dissident inquiry that interrogate unsubstantiated claims, and build bridges of unity and understanding. In our ongoing efforts to democratize and decolonize colleges, universities and academic scholarship, we must teach to the urgency of the moment, and in doing so reach out beyond our campuses and beyond national borders.

We encourage our NWSA members to stand with, defend and provide sanctuary for our students and colleagues who are most vulnerable. In these challenging times we must embrace and reclaim the activist roots that carved out a place for women’s and gender studies and other interdisciplinary, critical areas of study within the Academy over forty years ago. In addition to recognizing the continued importance of the rigorous and clarifying scholarship that has been the hallmark of NWSA members, we also encourage members to organize teach-ins and vigils, and to explore ever more creative forms of learning, sharing, and mobilizing. Speak out loudly and consistently through letters, petitions and collective statements. We cannot accept the skewed argument that it is not our place, or it is somehow unprofessional, to speak out. On the contrary, speak out we must. It is our ethical obligation to do so. And in doing so we are inspired and empowered by our collective effort.

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NWSA has more than 2,000 individual and 350 institutional members working in varied specialties across the United States and around the world. Through scholarship, pedagogy and praxis our members actively pursue knowledge to promote a just world in which all persons can develop to their fullest potential—one free from ideologies, systems of privilege or structures that oppress or exploit some for the advantage of others. It is with this mission in mind that we call upon our NWSA membership to be vocal, to be courageous, to be bold, to be visible and to be engaged with each other and with a larger public in this critical time. Despite our trepidations about the future, we are bolstered by the creative, generative, humane and principled stances and actions many have already taken. We stand with and remain supportive of our members in the work that lies ahead.